Loch Lomond and the Trossachs National Park
Scotland

Details for Loch Lomond and the Trossachs National Park

Firkin Point at Loch Lomond
Ross Priory on the shores of Loch Lomond

Whether you take the high road or the low road there is so much to see and do at the Loch Lomond and Trossachs National Park.

Situated around the majestic waters of Loch Lomond, the Park is the fourth largest in Britain with a total area of 1,865 kilometres. The fault line which divides the Highlands form the Lowlands runs right through the Park giving it a diversity of terrains from high peaks to wooded glens.

Loch Lomond, the largest stretch of inland water in Britain, by surface area, is surrounded by a range of hills and the Trossachs, a large region of woodland glen, which lies to east of the loch.  There are 30 islands within the Loch to visit.  This mesmerising expanse of water has a shoreline of over 153 kilometres, making ideal for activities including walking and cycling.

The West Highland Way walking route passes through the Park and this attracts a significant number of visitors each year who are keen to hike the 154 kilometres from the outskirts of Glasgow to the eastern shore of Loch Lomond.  Others might prefer a gentle saunter on one of the many walks on the bonny, bonny banks of Loch Lomond.  There is a range of cycling routes to cater for all levels of cycling abilities.  These include family friendly cycle paths, forest tracks and uncompromising trails and challenging terrain for mountain bikers.

Climbers are attracted to the National Park by the abundance of natural facilities.  There are 21 Munros, peaks over 914 metres, and 19 Corbetts, peaks of between 762 and 914 metres, to clamber up and over.  There are a number...

 

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